HVAC Philly Blog

Providing Comfort To The Greater Philadelphia Area For Over 20 Years

Could My Furnace Be Making Me Sick? — January 12, 2018

Could My Furnace Be Making Me Sick?

Here in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County PA areas, winter is in full swing. It is the season of hibernation, where home is our sanctuary that we can find warmth, cozy up,  and hide from the winter chill. The holidays have come and gone, and we’ve already had frigid temperatures with snow storms hit our area. With all of the cold also comes the dreaded flu season.  Could your stuffy nose and body aches be related to your furnace? The furnace repair specialists, HVAC Philly, answer the question, “Could my furnace be making me sick?”

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HVAC Philly of the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County, PA areas answers the question. “Is my furnace making me sick?”

Most people believe that being cold or being outside in cold damp weather is what causes us to become ill, but the truth is that indoor air can actually be 5 times more polluted than outside air. As we are seeking comfort and warmth by staying inside our warm home, we are increasing the odds of spreading infection by breathing in the stagnant air that has been recycled. You are more likely to inhale harmful pollutants and pathogens from other people who may be sick and are breathing and recycling the same air.

Even though it may sound that illness is inevitable there are some actions you can take to prevent it

Most heating systems redisperse indoor air, which preserves energy but also causes an increase of indoor air pollutants if your air filter is dirty.  Dander from pets, mold, pollen, and dust particles can all cause pollutants in the air.  Your first defense is to change your filter. A clean air filter will trap the indoor pollutants when the air circulates through. It is recommended to change your air filter every 1-3 months to help maintain a cleaner air flow.

In addition to consistent filter changes, setting up qualified and recurrent HVAC maintenance keeps your heating and air conditioning system running efficiently. It’s not often that ductwork would be forefront on your mind, which means maintenance is even further from your mind. However, neglecting your ductwork can be the cause of more airborne pollutants that can lead to health issues such as eye, nose, and throat irritation. Be sure that your ductwork is a completely sealed system to safeguard clean fresh air comes from your registers.

A little known and most effective way to fight against microorganisms like bacteria, viruses, and other pathogens is by using UV germicidal lights. UV systems are set up in the ductwork of your central air system or in the air handler. While the air moves throughout your HVAC system, the UV-C light will kill all airborne microbes and odors, like that fish dinner you cooked the night before. There is a photocatalytic reaction that sterilizes and transforms these pollutants into innocuous water vapor and carbon dioxide.

So to answer the question “Is my furnace making me sick?” the answer is that there is a high chance the pollutants that are force-fed through your HVAC system during the winter months, without the ability to open windows to let in fresh air, could most definitely be causing symptoms of illness. If you suspect that your furnace is causing more sniffles than warmth it may be time to call in your local HVAC specialist to ensure your furnace is running properly this winter, with clean fresh air circulating throughout your home.

Need professional help in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks, or Montgomery, PA area?

Looking for a service team with the skills and training to bring you reliable heating repair? We’ve been offering leading heating services for over 20 years, so call us now or contact us online to schedule service!

Follow our HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Maintenance all winter long on FacebookGoogle+TumblrTwitter, or LinkedIn to learn more.

HVAC Philly is readily available to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. www.hvacphilly.com

HVAC Service Provided to

PhiladelphiaSouth Philadelphia FeastervilleBensalemBristolLanghorneYardleyFairless HillsChurchvilleNewtownSouthamptown,  Warminster,  Holland,  Jamison,  MorrisvilleElkins ParkCheltenhamGlensideAbingtonHuntingdon ValleyWillow grooveHorsham , and Jenkintown.

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HVAC Philly FAQ Series: Heating Repair and Maintenance FAQ 7 — January 9, 2018

HVAC Philly FAQ Series: Heating Repair and Maintenance FAQ 7

Why Does My Furnace Keep Running?

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HVAC Philly FAQ; Why does my furnace keep running?

Philadelphia has been hit hard by freezing temperatures. Residents in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County, PA areas can certainly expect to be giving their furnaces a run for their money. However, when it seems as though your furnace is constantly running, without cycling off there may be a bigger issue than the frigid weather.

During the winter months your thermostat should be set to AUTO, and only be blowing when your furnace is in a heating cycle. A constant running “furnace” is actually your fan blowing air, whether or not your furnace is actually heating.

Now that we’ve established that it is NOT normal, we now need to figure out WHY? HVAC Philly, furnace repair experts in the greater Philadelphia area, offer some reasons as to why your furnace is constantly running.  The top reasons are:

  • A thermostat wire that has shorted
  • The fan limit switch has a shorted wire
  • The fan limit switch is on “manual override”
  • The fan setting on the thermostat is set wrong

HVAC Philly will walk you through the possible issues, and help you with the correct steps to identify the problem. We will guide you to resolving the problem on your own and are here to provide professional assistance for furnace repair where professional help is necessary.

Your first step is to make sure that your thermostat is properly set. An improperly set thermostat can be the main reason for your furnace to continuously force heat into your home. These steps will help you to troubleshoot any thermostat issues you may have.

Try setting your thermostat to a lower temperature than the current room temperature.  By doing this, you will shut the furnace down and will stop your thermostat from signaling for more heat. If your furnace was in the middle of a heating cycle, you will want to wait a few minutes for the blower fan to stop running.

After waiting 3 to 4 minutes, did the furnace fan stop blowing? If yes, that would indicate that you set your set thermostat temperature too high, making your furnace force heat continuously so it can reach that temperature.

An improperly winterized home can also cause your furnace to constantly blow heat as well, by hot air going out of the home and cold air coming in.

If, after adjusting your thermostat, you notice that your furnace continues working to heat your home without reaching the set temperature it is best to call in a professional to give a thorough inspection of your heating system and home to provide possible solutions.

Set your fan to AUTO not ON. A fan will continue to run if it is set to ON, despite whether or not your furnace is actually heating.

Setting your fan to ON will actually waste money as it forces the fan motor to run constantly.

After troubleshooting your thermostat the next step would be to troubleshoot fan limit switch problems

Right under your furnace hood, you will find your fan limit switch. The fan limit switch controls when your furnace fan turns on and off. Inside the switch is a probe that keeps track of the temperature of the burner assembly, it turns the fan on once the burners are hot and off once the burners cool down.

However, if your furnace fan does not stop blowing, here are 2 problems you might have with your furnace fan limit switch

  • Your fan limit switch may have been set to manual override
  • Your fan limit switch is faulty and may need to be rewired or replaced

To find out which of the above may be your issue, follow these steps listed below:

Find your fan limit switch located directly under the furnace hood, and check to see if the white knob is pressed in.  If it is, that means your switch is set to manual override and would be always running.

You will want to then pull the white button out to reset your fan limit switch to AUTO. Doing this will ensure that the fan will automatically turn on when the furnace is heating and shut off once the need for heat stops.

If, when you check your fan limit switch, you find that the white knob was NOT pushed in, that would indicate that it was already set to AUTO and you would want to contact your local HVAC professional come in to inspect and perform any furnace repairs you may need to be done.

 

Need professional help in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks, or Montgomery, PA area?

Looking for a service team with the skills and training to bring you reliable heating repair? We’ve been offering leading heating services for over 20 years, so call us now or contact us online to schedule service!

Follow our HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Maintenance all winter long on FacebookGoogle+TumblrTwitter, or LinkedIn to learn more.

HVAC Philly is readily available to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. www.hvacphilly.com

HVAC Service Provided to

PhiladelphiaSouth Philadelphia FeastervilleBensalemBristolLanghorneYardleyFairless HillsChurchvilleNewtownSouthamptown,  Warminster,  Holland,  Jamison,  MorrisvilleElkins ParkCheltenhamGlensideAbingtonHuntingdon ValleyWillow grooveHorsham , and Jenkintown.

Tips To Get Your Heating System Ready For Winter Storms — January 4, 2018

Tips To Get Your Heating System Ready For Winter Storms

HVAC Philly Tips To Get Your Heating System Ready For Winter Storms
Philadelphia winter storm

Why is it important to ready your furnace and heat system for the winter?

Readying your HVAC system for winter has many benefits. Besides the obvious one of preventing your furnace from breaking down and needing an emergency heating repair in the middle of a blizzard or – 2-degree weather, it can also, cut your energy usage, lower your electricity bill, and extend the life of your HVAC system.If we have learned one thing from winters past in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County, PA areas, it is that when winter does come, it hits hard and fast. That is why HVAC Philly suggests following the tips, listed below, to prepare for frigid temperatures and winter storms headed our way this season.

Make sure your home is properly insulated.

The first way to manage the temperature and keep it regulated throughout the house is insulation. Most heat loss occurs through the roof, as heat rises. Properly insulating any attic space you may have is your first defense against heat loss and rising heat bills. The more heat you lose, the more money you spend.  You can either call a professional or do it yourself. However it gets done, it needs to be on your priority list. Your pockets and warm family will thank you!

Unblock all vents in your home.

Furniture such as dressers, sofa’s or other large objects can inadvertently be preventing proper airflow in your home. The result would be an uncomfortable temperature drop and more pressure placed on your furnace to produce heat. Like anything that works too hard, you are increasing your odds of a mechanical breakdown. Move any objects that are obstructing airflow, and make sure your vents are able to properly distribute airflow.

Replace dirty air filters routinely.

The best time to replace an air filter is between 1 to 3 months. Allergens and other pollutants will generally dictate how soon you should replace an air filter. In city environments, like Philadelphia, there will be more pollutants in the air, it may be best to be on a monthly replacement schedule. Filters that are dirty will need to work harder to get your home heated. This will increase your energy costs as well as add more allergens and pollutants into your home’s air.

Give your heat pump an inspection.

Luckily there is not a lot of maintenance concerning your heat pump. The majority of them are made to stop snow from accumulating on the unit. HVAC Philly suggests you make sure the top of the heat pump is clear during times of heavy ice or snow.

If your furnace is approaching its max lifespan, replace it now!

Most furnaces usually last from 15 up to 20 years with annual maintenance. If there is no annual maintenance, the furnace is at an increased chance of needing replacement much sooner. The alternative to replacing a furnace at the end of it’s run? Having to call an HVAC professional for an emergency furnace repair or installation during a bitterly cold winter night. Definitely not fun for you or your family. Make sure you are not scrambling to get an HVAC contractor to your home for an emergency repair in the middle of a snowstorm! Replace your furnace before the winter snowstorms hit.

Some things that may point to a necessary furnace replacement:

  • your furnace has not been serviced regularly
  • your heating bills are getting higher
  • the furnace seems to be struggling to heat your home
  • it is costing more and more money to repair your furnace
  • your furnace is approaching the 15-20 year mark

FURNACE MAINTENANCE

A lot of furnace repairs are due to lack of maintenance. Furnace maintenance is one of the easiest and most impactful ways to prepare your home for extreme winter weather, including snow storms and below freezing temperatures. Heating maintenance is an important part of maintaining the health and longevity of your furnace. Be sure to schedule an annual maintenance with your local HVAC professional.

This 2018 winter season is bringing some record lows throughout the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County, PA areas. Heavy snow is in the forecast and HVAC Philly is here to help you prepare for any emergency heating situations that may occur. We have been providing quality, professional furnace repair, and heating repair for over 20 years. All of the common issues we’ve listed above can be addressed and resolved by a one our HVAC professionals.

Need professional help in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks, or Montgomery, PA area?

Looking for a service team with the skills and training to bring you reliable heating repair? We’ve been offering leading heating services for over 20 years, so call us now or contact us online to schedule service!

Follow our HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Maintenance all winter long on FacebookGoogle+TumblrTwitter, or LinkedIn to learn more.

HVAC Philly is readily available to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. www.hvacphilly.com

HVAC Service Provided to

PhiladelphiaSouth Philadelphia FeastervilleBensalemBristolLanghorneYardleyFairless HillsChurchvilleNewtownSouthamptown,  Warminster,  Holland,  Jamison,  MorrisvilleElkins ParkCheltenhamGlensideAbingtonHuntingdon ValleyWillow grooveHorsham , and Jenkintown.

 

What Should I Do If My Furnace Stops Working? — December 30, 2017

What Should I Do If My Furnace Stops Working?

Frigid weather is here for the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County PA homeowners. Temperatures continue to drop to the single digits at night and seem to be staying there for some time.

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When the furnace will not come on, it can be not only extremely frustrating it can be quite distressing as well. It’s even more frustrating when you can hear the furnace clicking on and getting ready to blow the much needed toasty warm air…but then the furnace just shuts down.

Furnaces are designed for reliability (assuming they’ve been maintained) over a long period and are one of the most expensive and most needed appliances in almost every home.

Reasons for the furnace not working can be complex or very simple. While you are probably better off leaving the difficult problems of thermocouples, wiring and motors to a qualified professional,  like those at HVAC Philly, there are a good number of things you can check before you phone a qualified HVAC contractor for service.

Before you attempt to fix a furnace that won’t start, make sure you know what kind of furnace you have. The most common in this area is a forced air, gas furnace. Here are 5 things you do your own to troubleshoot the problem:

  1. Check to make sure the furnace filter is clean. If the air flow out of your registers seems low, check the air filter. An extremely dirty air filter can block air flow. Make sure all registers are open and not obstructed.
  1. Check the pilot light. (Electronic ignitions will not have a pilot light). If your furnace clicks on or initiates the start cycle, but does not fire up, you likely have a faulty or dirty ignitor/sensor. This is one of the most common furnace problems. Under normal conditions, the furnace is notified by the thermostat to click on, the ignitor gets red hot and then initiates the entire process of igniting the gas and blowing the hot air  If You Feel Comfortable: Check the error codes in your furnace user manual to make sure you do not have a more serious problem. To fix the furnace that won’t start, turn off the power to the furnace-and turn off the gas. Remove the front panel and look for the ignitor/sensor. Refer to your user manual to locate the ignitor. It is usually located near where the flames shoot out of the burners. Basically, the furnace will not continue in the starting sequence because the sensor/ignitor is dirty and needs to be cleaned. It is very easy to remove the sensor with a screwdriver. Clean the probe on the sensor by rubbing it with some medium grain sandpaper. Do a thorough job, but be careful not to break the thing. Replace the sensor exactly the way you found it. Put the front panel back on, turn on the gas, and then turn on the power. Turn up the temperature on your thermostat to see if your furnace will fire up. If this doesn’t solve the problem, time to give us a call.
  1. Check the settings on your thermostat. Make sure the temperature control selector is set above the current room temperature, and the system switch is in the HEAT or AUTO position. The fan switch should be set to ON for continuous airflow or AUTO if you want the blower to operate only while the furnace is operating. Try to get the furnace to turn on by raising the thermostat to its highest temperature setting.
  1. Check to make sure power to the furnace is on. There’s a power disconnect switch by the furnace, even gas systems use electricity. Check the fuse/breaker at the electrical panel for the furnace to make sure the breaker has not tripped. Make sure the power switch next to the furnace is in the “On” position.
  1. Finally, make sure the gas supply to the furnace is open. Check to make sure the gas control valve to the furnace is open. A disruption of the gas supply to your heating system could leave your heating system without fuel. If you smell gas, leave your home immediately and then call HVAC Philly for an emergency repair.

If the problem persists, please call us.

Need professional help in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks, or Montgomery, PA area?

Looking for a service team with the skills and training to bring you reliable heating repair? We’ve been offering leading heating services for over 20 years, so call us now or contact us online to schedule service!

Follow our HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Maintenance all winter long on FacebookGoogle+TumblrTwitter, or LinkedIn to learn more.

HVAC Philly is readily available to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. www.hvacphilly.com

HVAC Service Provided to

PhiladelphiaSouth Philadelphia FeastervilleBensalemBristolLanghorneYardleyFairless HillsChurchvilleNewtownSouthamptown,  Warminster,  Holland,  Jamison,  MorrisvilleElkins ParkCheltenhamGlensideAbingtonHuntingdon ValleyWillow grooveHorsham , and Jenkintown.

HVAC Philly FAQ Series: Heating Repair and Maintenance FAQ 6 — December 26, 2017

HVAC Philly FAQ Series: Heating Repair and Maintenance FAQ 6

What is the best way to heat my home?

home-insulation

There are a number of available options when it comes to heating your home. Some offer monetary savings, and others are appealing due to their convenience. However, trying to determine which option is the most cost-effective for you can be frustrating, and solutions will vary depending on your location and the current market prices.

Natural Gas

Natural gas is the main source of heating fuel for all U.S. regions except the South. Natural gas is considered a clean, an environmentally benign fuel that contains fewer impurities and results in less pollution.

About 90 percent of all natural gas is delivered as useful energy, making it a highly efficient fuel, as compared to electricity, which utilizes only about 30 percent.

Electricity

Electricity is most popular in the Southern region of the United States. It is available in many forms, from whole house heating units to baseboard and space heaters. Because of its generation and transmission loss, though, it can be one of the more expensive ways to heat your home.

When using electric heat, a heat pump can give you more efficient use of the electricity and cut usage by as much as 50 percent — though this may not be as significant in Southern and Western states.

Oil

Heating oil is used more in the Northeast region of the United States and is debatably one of the more expensive heating options. This could be due to that fact that these systems have a long lifespan — as much as 30 years or more if properly maintained — and many existing systems are not as efficient the newer units.

Oil is a clean, renewable resource that with current technology, burns cleanly, producing almost zero emissions. Oil is also considered a safe fuel source with an ignition point of 140 degrees, making the danger of explosion unlikely.

Propane

Propane is most popular in the Midwest region of the United States. It’s a safe, nontoxic fuel that will not contaminate soil or groundwater and is delivered from either a surface or underground tank that sits on your property. You can purchase your own tank or rent one from the fuel company.

Propane will vary in cost, depending on demand and availability but can be put on a pre-paid autofill schedule to help alleviate winter price increases.

Wood

With the growing popularity of homesteading and the desire to find more sustainable energy solutions, wood has seen a 33 percent usage increase since 2005.

While wood appears to be one of the least expensive options, there may be other considerations. Many insurance companies increase prices for homes that have wood stoves or fireplaces.

One option to help stave off these higher premiums could be an outdoor wood-fired boiler. Outdoor wood-fired boilers work with your existing duct system, but because they are outside, they aren’t considered a fire hazard like an indoor stove.

Need professional help in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks, or Montgomery, PA area?

Looking for a service team with the skills and training to bring you reliable heating repair? We’ve been offering leading heating services for over 20 years, so call us now or contact us online to schedule service!

Follow our HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Maintenance all winter long on FacebookGoogle+TumblrTwitter, or LinkedIn to learn more.

HVAC Philly is readily available to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. www.hvacphilly.com

HVAC Service Provided to

PhiladelphiaSouth Philadelphia FeastervilleBensalemBristolLanghorneYardleyFairless HillsChurchvilleNewtownSouthamptown,  Warminster,  Holland,  Jamison,  MorrisvilleElkins ParkCheltenhamGlensideAbingtonHuntingdon ValleyWillow grooveHorsham , and Jenkintown.

HVAC Philly FAQ Series: Heating Repair and Maintenance FAQ 5 — December 21, 2017

HVAC Philly FAQ Series: Heating Repair and Maintenance FAQ 5

Why is my gas furnace leaking water?

furnace leaking water

 

Have you noticed water leaking at the base of your furnace as it is running? Have you also noticed the air filter of the furnace is wet as well?

There are a few things that could be happening here. But if you have a high-efficiency furnace, here’s the most common cause: a condensation leak.

HVAC Philly, the premier furnace repair experts of the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County, PA areas, explains why a furnace creates condensation, and what’s causing it to leak out of your furnace.

Note: You’ll know if you have a high-efficiency furnace if:

  • The yellow energy guide tag says your furnace’s efficiency is 90% or higher AFUE.
  • The vent/flue pipe is white PVC as opposed to metal.

Why does a high-efficiency furnace create condensation?

The reason high-efficiency furnaces create condensation is all about how the furnace extracts heat from combustion gases.

Where a lower-efficiency furnace extracts some heat from combustion gases and then quickly vents them out the flue pipe, a high-efficiency furnace, to extract more heat, has 2 heat exchangers. These allow the furnace to extract heat from the gases for a longer period of time. This is what causes the combustion gases to cool and then condense.

The condensation then exits out of your home through a drain. However if that water is pooling around the furnace, that indicates that there is a problem preventing it from draining properly.

The main causes of a condensation leak around a high-efficiency furnace

  • Clogged condensation tubing
  • Clogged condensation drain
  • Breaks in the condensation line
  • Issues with the condensate pump (if you have one)

You’ll need a furnace technician to diagnose which of these is the issue and then repair the furnace.

There may be other causes of leaking water around a furnace

If you have a conventional, standard-efficiency furnace, then its flue pipe may be incorrectly sized.

If you have a whole-house humidifier connected to the furnace, there may be an issue which is causing the humidifier to leak into your furnace. Your humidifier should be getting annual maintenance from a professional to prevent this.

Need professional help in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks, or Montgomery, PA area?

Looking for a service team with the skills and training to bring you reliable heating repair? We’ve been offering leading heating services for over 20 years, so call us now or contact us online to schedule service!

Follow our HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Maintenance all winter long on FacebookGoogle+TumblrTwitter, or LinkedIn to learn more.

HVAC Philly is readily available to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. www.hvacphilly.com

HVAC Service Provided to

PhiladelphiaSouth Philadelphia FeastervilleBensalemBristolLanghorneYardleyFairless HillsChurchvilleNewtownSouthamptown,  Warminster,  Holland,  Jamison,  MorrisvilleElkins ParkCheltenhamGlensideAbingtonHuntingdon ValleyWillow grooveHorsham , and Jenkintown.

 

HVAC Philly FAQ Series: Heating Repair and Maintenance FAQ 4 — December 18, 2017

HVAC Philly FAQ Series: Heating Repair and Maintenance FAQ 4

Why is my gas furnace making a buzzing noise when it starts up?

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A buzzing noise from your furnace might be a simple nuisance with an easy fix or a sign of a bigger problem, where you may need to call in a furnace repair specialist like HVAC Philly, who have been providing top-notch heating repair services to the greater Philadelphia, Bucks, and Montgomery County, PA areas for over 20 years.

A furnace can be installed in different parts of a home, including the basement, attic or crawl space. Knowing the possible causes of furnace buzzing and some solutions can help you save time and money on repairs.

HVAC Philly Gives Possible Causes

  • One common cause of buzzing in a furnace is a loosely mounted transformer box. Your furnace has a transformer that changes the incoming power to the voltage required for the furnace. The transformer is a small box inside the furnace that has wire connections on both sides. If the transformer is dying or not securely mounted, it will buzz.
  • Other possible causes include the failure of the blower motor or capacitor. The blower motor powers the fan inside the furnace, which blows the cool or hot air from the furnace into your home. A blower motor that is or dying or blown often buzzes or hums if power is turned on to the furnace.
  • The capacitor, a silver device that stores electricity, helps the motor start. If the capacitor is shot, the motor might buzz.

Performing an Inspection

Inspecting your furnace can help you determine the cause of the noise. You can remove the front cover over the burner section of the furnace and have another person in the home use the thermostat to call for heat. When the furnace kicks on, look on the inside and try to determine what area the buzzing is coming from.

*It is very important that you DO NOT touch any parts when the furnace is operating; you can be electrocuted.*

Focus on the transformer first. If you’ve ruled out the transformer, observe the blower motor when the furnace kicks on. If you didn’t see the blower motor when you took the burner panel off, look for a second panel, sometimes near the bottom of the furnace, to open to expose the motor. Check the capacitors for leaks or corrosion.

HVAC Philly recommends that you contact your local HVAC professional to perform an inspection to be safe and to avoid any accidental injuries. HVAC Philly serves the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County PA areas, and are available for 24/7 Emergency Services.

Solutions

  • Tighten a poorly mounted or loose buzzing transformer box with a screwdriver.
  • Call for professional help if the transformer itself needs to be replaced or if securing the mounting doesn’t solve the problem.
  • A blown capacitor is relatively easy and inexpensive to replace. Because the capacitor can cause problems with the motor, replacing the capacitor before changing the motor is a low-cost solution that might fix the buzzing.
  • A burned out, buzzing, blower motor is more difficult to deal with. Replacement involves disconnecting the old motor wires and removing the motor shaft from the blower housing; professional help is highly recommended.

Significance

Failing to repair the buzzing can result in various consequences, depending on the cause of the sound.

  • The furnace will stop working properly if the capacitor, motor or a dying transformer is the cause of the sound; this is a hazard to occupants in extremely cold or hot weather. The health of a vulnerable person, such as a senior citizen, living in the home is especially threatened.
  • If a loose transformer is to blame, the box can sustain damage from the prolonged vibrations and will eventually need to be replaced. A faulty or poorly mounted transformer can increase in noise over time, echoing throughout the house’s ductwork, and faulty transformers can get hot or smoke, posing a possible fire hazard.

Looking for a service team with the skills and training to bring you reliable heating repair? We’ve been offering leading heating services for over 20 years, so call us now or contact us online to schedule service!

Follow our HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Maintenance all winter long on FacebookGoogle+TumblrTwitter, or LinkedIn to learn more.

HVAC Philly is readily available to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. www.hvacphilly.com

HVAC Service Provided to

PhiladelphiaSouth Philadelphia FeastervilleBensalemBristolLanghorneYardleyFairless HillsChurchvilleNewtownSouthamptown,  Warminster,  Holland,  Jamison,  MorrisvilleElkins ParkCheltenhamGlensideAbingtonHuntingdon ValleyWillow grooveHorsham , and Jenkintown.

HVAC Philly FAQ Series: Heating Repair and Maintenance FAQ 3 — December 13, 2017

HVAC Philly FAQ Series: Heating Repair and Maintenance FAQ 3

What Is A Heat Pump?

Servicing Furnace_0

heat pump is an all-in-one heating and air conditioning system that works year-round to keep your Philadelphia home/business comfortable.

During warmer months, a heat pump works like a normal air conditioner. It extracts heat from inside the home and transfers it to the outdoor air. In colder weather, however, the process reverses—the unit collects heat from the outdoor air and transferring it inside your home.

Even when the air outside feels extremely cold, the air still contains some heat. The heat pump pulls the heat from this cold outdoor air and sends it inside to warm your home. When there’s not enough heat in the outside air to meet the demand of the thermostat setting, an electric heater supplements the outdoor air to warm the home. Extremely efficient, this process produces two to three times more heat than the energy it uses.

Also, a heat pump can be an effective add-on option to use in conjunction with an existing gas furnace. With this dual-fuel option, the two systems share the heating load but never function at the same time. Each system operates when it is most cost-effective. The heat pump will be the primary heating and cooling system. However, when the temperature drops below the heat pump’s ability to operate as efficiently as the gas furnace, the gas furnace will take over until the temperature rises enough for the heat pump to operate more efficiently.

To learn if a dual-fuel system is right for your home, contact HVAC Philly to learn more.

Heating Repair and Maintenance in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County, PA areas.

Looking for a service team with the skills and training to bring you reliable heating repair? We’ve been offering leading heating services for over 20 years, so call us now or contact us online to schedule service!

Follow our HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Maintenance all winter long on FacebookGoogle+TumblrTwitter, or LinkedIn to learn more.

HVAC Philly is readily available to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. www.hvacphilly.com

HVAC Service Provided to

PhiladelphiaSouth Philadelphia FeastervilleBensalemBristolLanghorneYardleyFairless HillsChurchvilleNewtownSouthamptown,  Warminster,  Holland,  Jamison,  MorrisvilleElkins ParkCheltenhamGlensideAbingtonHuntingdon ValleyWillow grooveHorsham , and Jenkintown.

HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Heating Maintenance (2) — December 10, 2017

HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Heating Maintenance (2)

FAQ (2) Do I need to clean my vent covers, how, and how often?

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Do I need to clean my vent covers? HVAC Philly, heating repair and maintenance experts in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County, PA gives an emphatic, YES, to that question. Not only for the obvious aesthetic reasons, but most importantly the fact that dirty vents indicate a need for a change in your filter, and an increased distribution of allergens throughout your home.

So then how do I go about cleaning my vents, and how often? 

HVAC Philly offers simple steps that will not only keep vents in your Philadelphia home looking great but also reduce allergens and increase the efficiency of your A/C and heating unit all at the same time. Help create a cleaner breathing environment for you and your family.

Monthly

Change the filter

  • Pick a standing date to change your filter, say the first of every month, it will be easy to remember or write on the filter the date you changed it. That way, nothing’s left to guesswork.

Clean the vents

  • Before cleaning vents, turn off the heat. If ceiling vents are particularly dirty, protect furniture by covering the area below the vent with a sheet. You also might want to wear a baseball cap to keep falling dust out of your eyes and hair.
  • Next, vacuum vents using a dusting brush attachment or a microfiber extendible duster. Don’t have either? Simply wipe with a dry microfiber cloth or a slightly damp Mr. Clean Magic Eraser.
  • Do not use water or other cleaning products because they can easily smear the dust onto the walls or ceilings and you’ll end up with an even bigger mess.

Twice a year

  • Before cleaning vent covers, turn off the heat/A/C.
  • Remove the smaller vent covers by unscrewing the screws in each corner. The covers will probably be full of dust on the inside and the outside. To clean, place the covers in a sink filled with hot, soapy water and wash with a microfiber cloth.
  • Use just a small amount of dish detergent, and don’t soak vent covers too long or rub too hard as the paint could come off. Then you’ll have a much bigger project on your hands.
  • Some of the dirt may be oily, depending on the type of heat you have in your house, if you burn lots of candles or if the vent is in the kitchen. Cut through oily residue with rubbing alcohol. Just remember to rub lightly so you don’t damage the paint.
  • Because of its size, you may have to clean the larger intake cover outside or in the bathtub. Just follow the same directions.
  • One last point: Make sure the covers are completely dry before re-installing them, otherwise dust particles will cling to the vent slats.
  • A final light wipe with a microfiber cloth will remove water spots and have vent covers looking perfect.

Heating Repair and Maintenance in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County, PA areas.

Looking for a service team with the skills and training to bring you reliable heating repair? We’ve been offering leading heating services for over 20 years, so call us now or contact us online to schedule service!

Follow our HVAC Philly FAQ Series; Heating Repair and Maintenance all winter long on FacebookGoogle+TumblrTwitter, or LinkedIn to learn more.

HVAC Philly is readily available to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. www.hvacphilly.com

HVAC Service Provided to

PhiladelphiaSouth Philadelphia FeastervilleBensalemBristolLanghorneYardleyFairless HillsChurchvilleNewtownSouthamptown,  Warminster,  Holland,  Jamison,  MorrisvilleElkins ParkCheltenhamGlensideAbingtonHuntingdon ValleyWillow grooveHorsham , and Jenkintown.

FAQ about Heating Repair and Maintenance Series; Why isn’t my furnace generating heat? — December 7, 2017

FAQ about Heating Repair and Maintenance Series; Why isn’t my furnace generating heat?

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As a trusted heating repair professional in the greater Philadelphia, Montgomery, and Bucks County areas, we get many questions about heating repair and heating maintenance.  HVAC Philly has gathered together the most frequently asked questions regarding heating repair and maintenance and have created a series to provide expert advice and answers to all of your typical and not so typical questions.

A typical question we hear at HVAC Philly during the winter season is “Why isn’t my furnace blowing warm air?” or “why isn’t my furnace generating heat?”.

Follow along with the team at HVAC Philly of the greater Philadelphia area while we discuss the most common causes!

The Many Causes of Furnaces Not Heating

There are many possibilities, because of that HVAC Philly is going to try to touch on them all, however, if you’re still confused or don’t see an obvious cause feel free to contact an HVAC Philly expert online.

The most common causes include:

  • A dirty air filter. You’ll notice that a large portion of the potential causes deal with various forms of airflow restriction. This is because when airflow is obstructed in a heating system it causes a) heated air to not move properly, and b) creates pressure problems in the unit. So be sure to check your filter first! It’s an easy fix to handle all on your own.
  • Control mistakes. Sometimes the brush of an elbow or even a child “playing” around, can be the cause. Before you shell out for a furnace repair call, be sure to ensure your settings are correct and that your fan is set to “on.”
  • Blocked vents. Vents blocked by cloth, furniture, dust, and grime, or vermin can all cause the issues we mentioned in the air filter description. Familiarize yourself with the location of all of your vents so you can check them fast if you have a heat generation issue.
  • Blower motor failure. No blower motor, no blowing warm air. Blower motor failure is hard to work out on your own. It is best to call in an HVAC Philly professional for this one.
  • Duct leaks. It’s possible that your ducts have holes, dents, or other leak-causing problems. If you haven’t had your ducts checked in a few years, you should schedule an inspection. Just one less thing to worry about, and you’ll get an energy-efficiency boost for your troubles.
  • Short-cycling. An incorrectly sized or overheating system can cause short-cycling, meaning the furnace only kicks on for a couple minutes at a time at best. Both a too large and a too small furnace can cause this issue.
  • Pilot not lit. If you have a gas furnace it’s wise to check your pilot if you’re not getting any warm air. A deactivated pilot can cause the furnace to heat poorly, or with modern furnace, it’ll cause them to shut down completely.

Furnace Repair in the greater Philadelphia, Bucks and Montgomery County, PA areas.

Looking for a service team with the skills and training to bring you reliable furnace repair? We’ve been offering leading furnace services for over 20nyears, so call us now or contact us online to schedule service!

Follow our FAQ Heating Repair and Maintenance Series all winter long on FacebookGoogle+TumblrTwitter, or LinkedIn to learn more.

HVAC Philly is readily available to answer any questions or to schedule an appointment. www.hvacphilly.com

HVAC Service Provided to

PhiladelphiaSouth Philadelphia FeastervilleBensalemBristolLanghorneYardleyFairless HillsChurchvilleNewtownSouthamptown,  Warminster,  Holland,  Jamison,  MorrisvilleElkins ParkCheltenhamGlensideAbingtonHuntingdon ValleyWillow grooveHorsham , and Jenkintown.